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Nuts About the Walnut House

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In the eight or nine years I've been following design in Portland, architect Dave Giulietti has been a constant presence. An unassuming teddy-bear of a guy, Dave was president of the AIA/Portland chapter back in 1999, when I first met him and we began a series of friendly Yankees-Mets arguments (my allegiances are in the Bronx, his in Queens). But more importantly, his firm, originally Giulietti & Associates, now Giulietti/Schouten Architects with the inclusion of partner Tim Schouten, has produced one nice house in this area after the other. They're not too proud to take on a kitchen remodel, but they also routinely have houses in local/regional home magazines like Oregon Home and Sunset, the latter of which a few years ago featured a Giulietti-designed home as the magazine's "Idea House".

One of Giulietti/Schouten's latest completed projects, the Walnut House, may be the firm's best work yet.

The house is situated a few miles outside of McMinnville, which coincidentally is where I grew up. The house is situated in a walnut grove, long part of the wishes of the client, a retiring Bay Area writer. And the house takes advantage of its vista, which offers views of both Mt. Hood and Mt. Jefferson.

As you can see from the pictures, this is a wonderfully glassy, spacious design. Any good project needs a good client, ideally one not only with money but an appreciation of architecture. In this case, the client was a fan of Eichler homes and other midcentury modern work in California. The architects worked with a simple material palette of wood, glass and metal with ample volumes to create what seems to me like a very inviting place inside and out. Kudos to the Giulietti/Schouten team for this excellent project.

by Brian Libby, 2007

Published with permission of Portland Architecture

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